Archive for the ‘cracking’ Category


Karsten Nohl

A German computer boffin has worked out a way to crack code used to encrypt most of the world’s mobile Internet traffic. Karsten Nohl is going to publish a guide to prompt global operators to improve their safeguards.

Karsten Nohl and his team of 24 hackers began working on the security algorithm for GSM (Global System for Mobiles) in August.Developed in 1988, the system prevents the interception of calls by forcing phones and base stations to change frequencies constantly. Most of the UK’s mobile phones use the GSM system and the breach represents a potential threat to the security of mobile phone communication.

The discovery of a way to eavesdrop so-called General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) technology allows a user to read emails and observe the Internet use of a person whose phone is hacked, said Karsten Nohl, head of Security Research Labs.”With our technology we can capture GPRS data communications in a radius of 5 km,” he told the paper before heading to a meeting of the Chaos Computer Club, a group that describes itself as Europe’s largest hacker coalition.

Nohl, who has a doctorate in computer engineering from the University of Virginia, insisted his work was purely academic. “We have written advice from our lawyers stating that our research is within the legal realm,” he said. “Obviously the data we produce could of course be used for illegitimate purposes.”

His modified phone was used to test networks in Germany, Italy and other European countries. In Germany, decrypted and read data transmissions on T-Mobile, O2 Germany, Vodafone and E-Plus. This was pretty easy because the level of encryption was weak.

Nohl, makes his cash working for mobile operators who hire him to detect vulnerabilities in their systems. He said that many operators run unencrypted data networks because it allows them to more easily filter out competing, unwanted services like Skype.

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Spain Detains 3 in PlayStation Cyberattacks

The Spanish police said on Friday that they had apprehended three men suspected of computer hacking in connection with recent attacks on Sony’s PlayStation Network as well as corporate and government Web sites around the world.

The National Police identified the three as the local leadership of the shadowy international network of computer hackers known as Anonymous, which has claimed responsibility for a wide variety of attacks.

Anonymous is composed of people from various countries organized into cells that share common goals, the police said, with activists operating anonymously in a coordinated fashion.

One of the three suspects, a 31-year-old Spaniard, was detained in the southern Spanish city of Almería sometime after May 18, the police said. He had a computer server in his apartment in the northern Spanish port city of Gijón, where the group is believed to have attacked the Web sites of the Sony PlayStation online gaming store.

The same computer server was also believed to have been used in coordinated attacks against two Spanish banks, BBVA and Bankia; the Italian energy company Enel; and government sites in Algeria, Chile, Colombia, Egypt, Libya, Iran, Spain and New Zealand, the police said.

The two other men, both also Spaniards in their early 30s, were picked up in Barcelona and Valencia. The police statement did not make clear the timing of those detentions, but a police spokeswoman said all had occurred recently.

The spokeswoman, who did not want to be identified in accordance with department policy, said all three were subsequently released, without bail, pending formal charges.

They were expected to be charged with forming an illegal association to attack public and corporate Web sites, a charge that carries a potential sentence of up to three years in prison.

The police opened their investigation last October, after hackers overwhelmed the Spanish Ministry of Culture’s Web site to protest legislation increasing punishments for illegal downloads.

It was not immediately clear how much of a role the group may have played in the recent attacks on Sony. About a dozen Sony Web sites and services around the world have been hacked; the biggest breaches forced the company, which is based in Tokyo, to shut down its popular PlayStation Network for a month beginning in April.

The Japanese company has acknowledged that hackers compromised the personal data of tens of millions of user accounts. Earlier this month, a separate hacker collective called Lulz Security, or LulzSec, said it had breached a Sony Pictures site and released vital source code.

Sony has estimated that the hacker attacks will cost it at least 14 billion yen ($175 million), in damages, including spending on information technology, legal costs, lower sales and free offers to lure back customers.

Mami Imada, a Sony spokeswoman in Tokyo, said she had no information on the detentions and declined to comment.

The police said that they had analyzed more than two million lines of chat logs since October, as well as Web pages used by the group to identify the leadership in Spain “with the capacity to make decisions and direct attacks.” Members of Anonymous used a computer program called L.O.I.C. to crash Web sites with denial-of-service attacks, the police said.

Among recent attacks, the hackers also brought down the site of the Spanish National Electoral Commission last month before regional and municipal elections. It was that attack, on May 18, that led to the detention of the suspect in Almería.

The movement against the antipiracy law has been closely linked to the broader youth-led political movements that have occurred in Puerta del Sol, the central square in Madrid, and in other city squares since May 15.

These protests have called for a complete overhaul of Spain’s political system and laws aimed at stopping illegal downloading.

Hiroko Tabuchi contributed reporting.


Introduction
1. Welcome to the basic NETBIOS document created by aCId_rAIn. This document will teach you some simple things about NETBIOS, what it does, how to use it, how to hack with it, and some other simple DOS commands that will be useful to you in the future. THIS DOCUMENT IS FOR NEWBIEZ ONLY!!! If you are NOT a newbie then don’t go any farther reading this because if you’re smart enough you probably already know it all. So don’t waste yourt time reading something that you already know.

1. Hardware and Firmware

1a. The BIOS
The BIOS, short for Basic Input/Output Services, is the control program of the PC. It is responsible for starting up your computer, transferring control of the system to your operating system, and for handling other low-level functions, such as disk access.
NOTE that the BIOS is not a software program, insofar as it is not purged from memory when you turn off the computer. It’s
firmware, which is basically software on a chip.
A convenient little feature that most BIOS manufacturers include is a startup password. This prevents access to the system until you enter the correct password.
If you can get access to the system after the password has been entered, then there are numerous software-based BIOS password extractors available from your local H/P/A/V site.
NETBIOS/NBTSTAT – What does it do?

2. NETBIOS, also known as NBTSTAT is a program run on the Windows system and is used for identifying a remote network or computer for file sharing enabled. We can expoit systems using this method. It may be old but on home pc’s sometimes it still works great. You can use it on your friend at home or something. I don’t care what you do, but remember, that you are reading this document because you want to learn. So I am going to teach you. Ok. So, you ask, “How do i get to NBTSTAT?” Well, there are two ways, but one’s faster.
Method 1:Start>Programs>MSDOS PROMPT>Type NBTSTAT
Method 2:Start>Run>Type Command>Type NBTSTAT
(Note: Please, help your poor soul if that isn’t like feeding you with a baby spoon.)
Ok! Now since you’re in the DOS command under NBTSTAT, you’re probably wondering what all that crap is that’s on your screen. These are the commands you may use. I’m only going to give you what you need to know since you are striving to be l33t. Your screen should look like the following:

NBTSTAT [ [-a RemoteName] [-A IP address] [-c] [-n]
[-r] [-R] [-RR] [-s] [-S] [interval] ]
-a (adapter status) Lists the remote machine’s name table given its name
-A (Adapter status) Lists the remote machine’s name table given its IP address.
-c (cache) Lists NBT’s cache of remote [machine] names and their IP addresses
-n (names) Lists local NetBIOS names.
-r (resolved) Lists names resolved by broadcast and via WINS
-R (Reload) Purges and reloads the remote cache name table
-S (Sessions) Lists sessions table with the destination IP addresses
-s (sessions) Lists sessions table converting destination IP addresses to computer NETBIOS names.
-RR (ReleaseRefresh) Sends Name Release packets to WINS and then, starts Refresh
RemoteName Remote host machine name.
IP address Dotted decimal representation of the IP address.
interval Redisplays selected statistics, pausing interval seconds between each display. Press Ctrl+C to stop redisplaying
statistics.
C:\WINDOWS\DESKTOP>
The only two commands that are going to be used and here they are:
-a (adapter status) Lists the remote machine’s name table given its name
-A (Adapter status) Lists the remote machine’s name table given its IP address.
Host Names

3. Now, the -a means that you will type in the HOST NAME of the person’s computer that you are trying to access. Just in case you don’t have any idea what a Host Name looks like here’s an example.
123-fgh-ppp.internet.com
there are many variations of these adresses. For each different address you see there is a new ISP assigned to that computer. look at the difference.
abc-123.internet.com
ghj-789.newnet.com
these are differnet host names as you can see, and, by identifying the last couple words you will be able to tell that these are two computers on two different ISPs. Now, here are two host names on the same ISP but a different located server.
123-fgh-ppp.internet.com
567-cde-ppp.internet.com
IP Addresses
4. You can resolce these host names if you want to the IP address (Internet Protocol)
IP addresses range in different numbers. An IP looks like this:
201.123.101.123
Most times you can tell if a computer is running on a cable connection because of the IP address’s numbers. On faster connections, usually the first two numbers are low. here’s a cable connection IP.
24.18.18.10
on dialup connections IP’s are higher, like this:
208.148.255.255
notice the 208 is higher than the 24 which is the cable connection.
REMEMBER THOUGH, NOT ALL IP ADDRESSES WILL BE LIKE THIS.
Some companies make IP addresses like this to fool the hacker into believing it’s a dialup, as a hacker would expect something big, like a T3 or an OC-18. Anyway This gives you an idea on IP addresses which you will be using on the nbtstat command.
Getting The IP Through DC (Direct Connection)
5. First. You’re going to need to find his IP or host name. Either will work. If you are on mIRC You can get it by typing /whois (nick) …where (nick) is the persons nickname without parenthesis. you will either get a host name or an IP. copy it down. If you do not get it or you are not using mIRC then you must direct connect to their computer or you may use a sniffer to figure out his IP or host name. It’s actually better to do it without the sniffer because most sniffers do not work now-a-days. So you want to establish a direct connection to their computer. OK, what is a direct connection? When you are:
Sending a file to their computer you are directly connected.
AOL INSTANT MESSENGER allows a Direct Connection to the user if accepted.
ICQ when sending a file or a chat request acception allows a direct connection.
Any time you are sending a file. You are directly connected. (Assuming you know the user is not using a proxy server.)
Voice Chatting on Yahoo establishes a direct connection.
If you have none of these programs, either i suggest you get one, get a sniffer, or read this next statement.
If you have any way of sending thema link to your site that enables site traffic statistics, and you can log in, send a link to your site, then check the stats and get the IP of the last visitor. It’s a simple and easy method i use. It even fool some smarter hackers, because it catches them off guard. Anyway, once you are directly
connected use either of the two methods i showed you earlier and get into DOS. Type NETSTAT -n. NETSTAT is a program that’s name is short for NET STATISTICS. It will show you all computers connected to yours. (This is also helpful if you think you are being hacked by a trojan horse and is on a port that you know such as Sub Seven: 27374.) Your screen should look like this showing the connections to your computer:
————————————————————————————————
C:\WINDOWS\DESKTOP>netstat -n
Active Connections
Proto Local Address Foreign Address State
TCP 172.255.255.82:1027 205.188.68.46:13784 ESTABLISHED
TCP 172.255.255.82:1036 205.188.44.3:5190 ESTABLISHED
TCP 172.255.255.82:1621 24.131.30.75:66 CLOSE_WAIT
TCP 172.255.255.82:1413 205.188.8.7:26778 ESTABLISHED
TCP 172.255.255.82:1483 64.4.13.209:1863 ESTABLISHED
C:\WINDOWS\DESKTOP>
————————————————————————————————
The first line indicated the Protocol (language) that is being used by the two computers.
TCP (Transfer Control Protocol) is being used in this and is most widely used.
Local address shows your IP address, or the IP address of the system you on.
Foreign address shows the address of the computer connected to yours.
State tells you what kind of connection is being made ESTABLISHED – means it will stay connected to you as long as you are on the program or as long as the computer is allowing or is needing the other computers connection to it. CLOSE_WAIT means the connection closes at times and waits until it is needed or you resume connection to be made again. One that isn’t on the list is TIME_WAIT which means it is timed. Most Ads that run on AOL are using TIME_WAIT states.
the way you know the person is directly connected to your computer is because of this:
————————————————————————————————
C:\WINDOWS\DESKTOP>netstat -n
Active Connections
Proto Local Address Foreign Address State
TCP 172.255.255.82:1027 205.188.68.46:13784 ESTABLISHED
TCP 172.255.255.82:1036 205.188.44.3:5190 ESTABLISHED
TCP 172.255.255.82:1621 24.131.30.75:66 CLOSE_WAIT
TCP 172.255.255.82:1413 abc-123-ppp.webnet.com ESTABLISHED
TCP 172.255.255.82:1483 64.4.13.209:1863 ESTABLISHED
C:\WINDOWS\DESKTOP>
————————————————————————————————
Notice the host name is included in the fourth line instead of the IP address on all. This is almost ALWAYS, the other computer that is connected to you. So here, now, you have the host name:
abc-123-ppp.webnet.com
If the host name is not listed and the IP is then it NO PROBLEM because either one works exactly the same. I am using abc-123-ppp.webnet.com host name as an example. Ok so now you have the IP and/or host name of the remote system you want to connect to. Time to hack!
Open up your DOS command. Open up NBTSTAT by typing NBTSTAT. Ok, there’s the crap again. Well, now time to try out what you have leanred from this document by testing it on the IP and/or host name of the remote system. Here’s the only thing you’ll need to know.
IMPORTANT, READ NOW!!!
-a (adapter status) Lists the remote machine’s name table given its name
-A (Adapter status) Lists the remote machine’s name table given its IP address.
Remember this?
Time to use it.
-a will be the host name
-A will be the IP
How do i know this?
Read the Statements following the -a -A commands. It tells you there what each command takes.
So have you found which one you have to use?
GOOD!
Time to start.
Using it to your advantage
6. Type this if you have the host name only.
NBTSTAT -a (In here put in hostname without parenthesis)
Type this is you have the IP address only.
NBTSTAT -A (In here put in IP address without parenthesis)
Now, hit enter and wait. Now Either one of two things came up
1. Host not found
2. Something that looks like this:
——————————————–
NetBIOS Local Name Table
Name Type Status
———————————————
GMVPS01 <00> UNIQUE Registered
WORKGROUP <00> GROUP Registered
GMVPS01 <03> UNIQUE Registered
GMVPS01 <20> UNIQUE Registered
WORKGROUP <1E> GROUP Registered
———————————————
If the computer responded “Host not found” Then either one of two things are the case:
1. You screwed up the host name.
2. The host is not hackable.
If number one is the case you’re in great luck. If two, This system isn’t hackable using the NBTSTAT command. So try another system.
If you got the table as above to come up, look at it carefully as i describe to you each part and its purpose.
Name – states the share name of that certain part of the computer
<00>, <03>, <20>, <1E> – Are the Hexidecimal codes giving you the services available on that share name.
Type – Is self-explanatory. It’s either turned on, or activated by you, or always on.
Status – Simply states that the share name is working and is activated.
Look above and look for the following line:
GMVPS01 <20> UNIQUE Registered
See it?
GOOD! Now this is important so listen up. The Hexidecimanl code of <20> means that file sharing is enabled on the share name that is on that line with the hex number. So that means GMVPS01 has file sharing enabled. So now you want to hack this. Here’s How to do it. (This is the hard part)
LMHOST File
7. There is a file in all Windows systems called LMHOST.sam. We need to simply add the IP into the LMHOST file because LMHOST basically acts as a network, automatically logging you on to it. So go to Start, Find, FIles or Folders. Type in LMHOST and hit enter. when it comes up open it using a text program such as wordpad, but make sure you do not leave the checkmark to “always open files with this extension” on that. Simply go through the LMHOST file until you see the part:
# This file is compatible with Microsoft LAN Manager 2.x TCP/IP lmhosts
# files and offers the following extensions:
#
# #PRE
# #DOM:
# #INCLUDE
# #BEGIN_ALTERNATE
# #END_ALTERNATE
# xnn (non-printing character support)
#
# Following any entry in the file with the characters “#PRE” will cause
# the entry to be preloaded into the name cache. By default, entries are
# not preloaded, but are parsed only after dynamic name resolution fails.
#
# Following an entry with the “#DOM:” tag will associate the
# entry with the domain specified by . This affects how the
# browser and logon services behave in TCP/IP environments. To preload
# the host name associated with #DOM entry, it is necessary to also add a
# #PRE to the line. The is always preloaded although it will not
# be shown when the name cache is viewed.
#
# Specifying “#INCLUDE ” will force the RFC NetBIOS (NBT)
# software to seek the specified and parse it as if it were
# local. is generally a UNC-based name, allowing a

# centralized lmhosts file to be maintained on a server.
# It is ALWAYS necessary to provide a mapping for the IP address of the
# server prior to the #INCLUDE. This mapping must use the #PRE directive.
# In addtion the share “public” in the example below must be in the
# LanManServer list of “NullSessionShares” in order for client machines to
# be able to read the lmhosts file successfully. This key is under
# \machine\system\currentcontrolset\services\lanmans erver\parameters\nullsessionshares
# in the registry. Simply add “public” to the list found there.
#
# The #BEGIN_ and #END_ALTERNATE keywords allow multiple #INCLUDE
# statements to be grouped together. Any single successful include
# will cause the group to succeed.
#
# Finally, non-printing characters can be embedded in mappings by
# first surrounding the NetBIOS name in quotations, then using the
# xnn notation to specify a hex value for a non-printing character.
Read this over and over until you understand the way you want your connection to be set. Here’s an example of how to add an IP the way I would do it:
#PRE #DOM:255.102.255.102 #INCLUDE
Pre will preload the connection as soon as you log on to the net. DOM is the domain or IP address of the host you are connecting to. INCLUDE will automaticall set you to that file path. In this case as soon as I log on to the net I will get access to 255.102.255.102 on the C:/ drive. The only problem with this is that by doin the NETSTAT command while you are connected, and get the IP of your machine. That’s why it only works on simple PC machines. Because people in these days are computer illiterate and have no idea of what these commands can do. They have no idea what NETSTAT is, so you can use that to your advantage. Most PC systems are kind of hard to hack using this method now because they are more secure and can tell when another system is trying to gain access. Also, besure that you (somehow) know whether they are running a firewall or not because it will block the connection to their computer. Most home systems aren’t running a firewall, and to make it better, they don’t know how operate the firewall, therefore, leaving the hole in the system. To help you out some, it would be a great idea to pick up on some programming languages to show you how the computer reads information and learn some things on TCP/IP (Transfer Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) If you want to find out whether they are running a firewall, simply hop on a Proxy and do a port scan on their IP. You will notice if they are running a firewall because most ports are closed. Either way, you still have a better chance of hacking a home system than hacking Microsoft.
Gaining Access
7. Once you have added this to you LMHOST file. You are basically done. All you need to do is go to:
Start
Find
Computer
Once you get there you simply type the IP address or the host name of the system. When it comes up, simply double click it, and boom! There’s a GUI for you so you don’t have to use DOS anymore. You can use DOS to do it, but it’s more simple and fun this way, so that’s the only way i put it. When you open the system you can edit, delete, rename, do anything to any file you wish. I would also delete the command file in C:/ because they may use it if they think someone is in their computer. Or simply delete the shortcut to it. Then here’s when the programming comes in handy. Instead of using the NBTSTAT method all the time, you can then program you own trojan on your OWN port number and upload it to the system. Then you will have easier access and you will also have a better GUI, with more features. DO NOT allow more than one connection to the system unless they are on a faster connection. If you are downloading something from their computer and they don’t know it and their connection is being slow, they may check their NETSTAT to see what is connected, which will show your IP and make them suspicious. Thats it. All there is to it. Now go out and scan a network or something and find a computer with port 21 or something open.


Final Fantasy maker Square Enix hacked

Deus Ex Human Revolution image The Deus Ex website was one of those hit. Hackers may have stolen users’ e-mail addresses.

Hackers have broken into two websites belonging to Japanese video games maker Square Enix.

The company confirmed that the e-mail addresses of up to 25,000 customers who had registered for product updates may have been stolen as a result.

Resumes of 350 people applying for jobs in its Canadian office could also have been copied from the web servers.

Square Enix, which makes the popular Final Fantasy, Deus Ex and Tomb Raider games, apologised for the breach.

In a statement, it said: “Square Enix can confirm a group of hackers gained access to parts of our Eidosmontreal.com website as well as two of our product sites.

“We immediately took the sites offline to assess how this had happened and what had been accessed, then took further measures to increase the security of these and all of our websites, before allowing the sites to go live again.”

It is understood that the websites affected were Eidosmontreal.com, run by Square Enix’s subsidiary Eidos, and Deusex.com, a promotional site for the forthcoming game, Deus Ex: Human Revolution.

Scammer’s dream

Graham Cluley, a consultant at security firm Sophos, warned that both leaks could cause problems for the individuals concerned.

“With the e-mail there is a danger that gamers could be e-mailed by someone pretending to be from the company who gets them to click on a link or run some malicious software,” he told BBC News.

“The resumes are a blueprint for identity theft. They have everything that scammers want. The only thing missing is credit card information.”

Mr Cluley pointed out that there was also the potential for huge embarrassment as it was unlikely those who had applied for jobs would want their current employers to know.

Square Enix said there was no evidence that the information had been distributed.

It also emphasised that the company does not hold customers’ credit card data on its web servers.

Mr Chippy

Shortly after the attack, both websites displayed the message “Owned by Chippy1337”, as well as several other known hacker names, including Xero, XiX and Venuism.

However, it appears that some or all of those names may have been misappropriated by the real attackers.

Lara Croft Tomb Raider maker Eidos owned one of the hacked sites. The company is owned by Square Enix

Logs of Internet Relay Chat (IRC) conversations have appeared on the online, which appear to show the perpetrators discussing the hack as they carried it out.

In one section, the individuals taking part wrote: “We put it in the name of chippy1337 and write the names ryan, dfs, xero, nikon, xix, venuism and evilhom3r.

The same person then added the comment, “lol [laugh out loud]”.

Security in the video games industry has been in the spotlight in recent weeks after the hacking attacks on Sony’s PlayStation Network and SOE online multiplayer system.

The personal details of around 100 million users were stolen from the company’s servers.

Investigations into the source of the data breach are continuing, with specialist computer forensic teams and the FBI getting involved.

The PlayStation Network remains offline, more than three weeks after the intrusion was discovered.

follow at xbee30 on twitter


Hackers Steal Data From Simon Cowell’s X-Factor

May. 6 2011 – 7:02 am
Simon Cowell at the National Television Awards...Image via Wikipedia

UPDATE: A spokesperson for Fox says the network is COPPA compliant and blocked people under 13 years of age from registering for X Factor audition information on Fox.com. “This is a matter that we take very seriously,” the spokesperson says.

——-

Cyber criminals have been on stealing spree of late. Not long after the the theft of more than 100 million user account details from Sony, Fox has confirmed that hackers also breached fox.com and obtained a file of details on 73,000 people who requested information about the X-Factor auditions.

The Fox TV show. which is an Americanized version of a British talent program. begins filming today. The winner of the show gets a $5 million recording contract with Cowell’s Syco music label and Sony Music.

A spokesperson for Fox tells me that media reports about the hacking incident incorrectly stated that data for 250,000 people had been compromised and that the correct number was “about 73,000.” They added that the data, which was stolen last week, did not include financial information, social security numbers or user names and passwords.

“We took immediate action to stop the illegal intrusion and began working with federal authorities,” said Gaude Paez of Fox. “We’ve [sent] emails to impacted registrants to notify them of the unauthorised access and providing [sic] them information to help them guard against spam and phishing.”

Carole Therelaut of Naked Security points out that the data breach comes after the X-Factor changed its rules in the U.S. to allow children as young as 12 to enter its competition, unnervingly putting personal data on pre-teens in the hands of faceless hackers.

Cowell’s troubles come amid a wave of cyber security issues making the news this week. In entertainment, the French DJ David Guetta has reportedly employed an ex-Pentagon investigator to look into the theft by hackers of his new single. According to BBC Newsbeat, Guetta says parts of the song “Where Them Girls At” featuring Nicki Minaj were stolen by a hacker who added their own production and posted it online, claiming it was Guetta’s.

Yesterday it emerged that Last Pass, a service that syncs with browsers to let you control a variety of passwords with one master password, had asked its users to change their master passwords after discovering a potential breach to its database. In its latest blog post Last Pass said the issue affects roughly 0.5% of users.  Read PC World’s interview with the CEO of Last Pass here.

Sony is meanwhile offering American customers affected by a massive security breach, $1 million-insurance policies and a year of identity theft protection, according to Bloomberg. It comes after 101.6 million user accounts on Sony’s PlayStation Network and the Sony Online Entertainment network for gamers were compromised by hackers.


Patients who participate in clinical trials expect that their personal information will remain confidential, but a recent study led by Dr. Khaled El-Emam, Canada Research Chair in Electronic Health Information at the CHEO Research Institute, found that the security practices used to transfer and share sensitive files were inadequate.

The two-part study, entitled “How Strong Are Passwords Used to Protect Personal Health Information in Clinical Trials?,” published February 16 in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, showed that the majority of passwords used to protect files are poorly constructed and easily cracked using commercial password recovery tools. Study coordinator interviews indicated that electronic information shared in the context of clinical trials may put personal health information at risk.

“The patients in these trials expect that their personal information will be protected,” said Dr. El-Emam. “This is critical for maintaining the trust of clinical trial participants, and the public in general.”

In the course of the study, passwords for 14 out of 15 sensitive files transmitted by email were successfully decoded. Of these 14, 13 contained sensitive health information and other potentially identifying factors such as name of study site, dates of birth, initials, and gender. File sharing practices were also found to be insecure, with unencrypted patient information being shared via email and posted on shared drives with common passwords.

“Cracking the passwords proved to be trivial,” said Dr. El-Emam. “Choices included passwords as simple as car makers (e.g., “nissan”), and common number sequences (e.g., “123”). It was easy for the password recovery tools to guess them.”

Poor security practices can be harmful to patients participating in clinical trials, who are at risk of being identified and possibly stigmatized by the disclosure of personal health information. There is also a potential for both medical and non-medical identity theft. In the context of international clinical trials, inadvertent disclosure of personal health information is considered a data breach in countries like the United States, which can lead to penalties in some states.

Dr. El-Emam believes that with some effort file sharing in clinical trials can be made secure: “There are protocols and tools that can be employed for secure file sharing. It may take more effort on the part of those who conduct clinical trials, but the alternative would not be acceptable.”

Dr. El-Emam makes several recommendations, including enforcement of strong passwords and encryption algorithms, encrypting all information sent via email including site queries, and minimizing password sharing.

The study was financed by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Canada Research Chair program.


The ISC DHCP client ‘dhclient’ is prone to a remote code-execution vulnerability because it fails to properly escape certain shell meta-characters from DHCP server responses.

A remote attacker can exploit this issue through a rogue DHCP server.

Successfully exploiting this issue allows a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code with superuser privileges, resulting in a complete compromise of the affected computer.

 

 

 

ISC DHCP ‘dhclient’ Shell Characters in Response Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Bugtraq ID: 47176
Class: Input Validation Error
CVE: CVE-2011-0997
Remote: Yes
Local: No
Published: Apr 05 2011 12:00AM
Updated: Apr 11 2011 02:35PM
Credit: Sebastian Krahmer and Marius Tomaschewski from the SUSE Security Team
Vulnerable: Slackware Linux 10.2
Slackware Linux 10.1
Slackware Linux 10.0
Slackware Linux 9.1
Slackware Linux 9.0
Slackware Linux x86_64 -current
Slackware Linux 13.1 x86_64
Slackware Linux 13.1
Slackware Linux 13.0 x86_64
Slackware Linux 13.0
Slackware Linux 12.2
Slackware Linux 12.1
Slackware Linux 12.0
Slackware Linux 11.0
Slackware Linux -current
RedHat Enterprise Linux WS 4
RedHat Enterprise Linux ES 4
RedHat Enterprise Linux Desktop Workstation 5 client
RedHat Enterprise Linux AS 4
RedHat Enterprise Linux Desktop version 4
RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 server
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation Optional 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Optional 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node Optional 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop Optional 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop 6
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop 5 client
MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 2010.1 x86_64
MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 2010.1
MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 2010.0 x86_64
MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 2010.0
MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 2009.0 x86_64
MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 2009.0
MandrakeSoft Enterprise Server 5 x86_64
MandrakeSoft Enterprise Server 5
MandrakeSoft Corporate Server 4.0 x86_64
MandrakeSoft Corporate Server 4.0
ISC DHCPD 4.1.1
ISC DHCPD 3.1.1
ISC DHCPD 3.0.4
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc9
+ Conectiva Linux Enterprise Edition 1.0
+ Debian Linux 3.0 sparc
+ Debian Linux 3.0 s/390
+ Debian Linux 3.0 ppc
+ Debian Linux 3.0 mipsel
+ Debian Linux 3.0 mips
+ Debian Linux 3.0 m68k
+ Debian Linux 3.0 ia-64
+ Debian Linux 3.0 ia-32
+ Debian Linux 3.0 hppa
+ Debian Linux 3.0 arm
+ Debian Linux 3.0 alpha
+ Debian Linux 3.0
+ OpenPKG OpenPKG 1.1
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 8.1
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc8
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc7
– FreeBSD FreeBSD 4.5
– FreeBSD FreeBSD 4.4
– FreeBSD FreeBSD 4.3
– FreeBSD FreeBSD 4.2
– FreeBSD FreeBSD 4.1.1
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc6
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 8.0 i386
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 8.0
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc5
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc4
+ OpenPKG OpenPKG 1.0
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc3
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc2
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc14
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc13
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc12
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc11
+ OpenPKG OpenPKG 1.2
+ OpenPKG OpenPKG Current
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc10
+ OpenPKG OpenPKG Current
ISC DHCPD 3.0.1 rc1
ISC DHCPD 3.0 rc4
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 7.2 i386
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 7.2
ISC DHCPD 3.0 rc12
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 7.3 sparc
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 7.3 ppc
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 7.3 i386
+ S.u.S.E. Linux 7.3
ISC DHCPD 3.0 pl2
ISC DHCPD 3.0 pl1
+ Gentoo Linux 1.4 _rc2
+ Gentoo Linux 1.4 _rc1
+ RedHat Linux 8.0 i386
+ RedHat Linux 8.0
+ Slackware Linux 8.1
ISC DHCPD 3.0 b2pl9
+ MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 7.2
ISC DHCPD 3.0 b2pl23
+ MandrakeSoft Single Network Firewall 7.2
ISC DHCPD 3.0
+ Caldera OpenLinux Server 3.1.1
+ Caldera OpenLinux Server 3.1
+ Caldera OpenLinux Workstation 3.1.1
+ Caldera OpenLinux Workstation 3.1
+ Conectiva Linux 8.0
+ MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 9.0
+ MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 8.2 ppc
+ MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 8.2
+ MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 8.1 ia64
+ MandrakeSoft Linux Mandrake 8.1
+ MandrakeSoft Multi Network Firewall 2.0
– S.u.S.E. Linux 8.0
– S.u.S.E. Linux 7.3
– S.u.S.E. Linux 7.2
– S.u.S.E. Linux Connectivity Server
– S.u.S.E. Linux Database Server 0
– S.u.S.E. Linux Enterprise Server for S/390
– S.u.S.E. SuSE eMail Server III
– S.u.S.E. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 7
ISC DHCPD 4.1.1-P1
ISC DHCPD 4.1
ISC DHCPD 4.0.2-P1
ISC DHCPD 4.0.1p1
ISC DHCPD 4.0
ISC DHCPD 3.0.5b1
ISC DHCPD 3.0.2rc1
ISC DHCP Client 3.0 b1pl17
ISC DHCP Client 3.0 b1pl14
ISC DHCP Client 3.0 b1
ISC DHCP Client 4.1.1-P1
ISC DHCP Client 4.1.0p1
ISC DHCP Client 4.1
ISC DHCP Client 4.0.2-P1
ISC DHCP Client 4.0.1p1
ISC DHCP Client 4.0
ISC DHCP Client 3.1.2p1
ISC DHCP Client 3.0
Debian Linux 5.0 sparc
Debian Linux 5.0 s/390
Debian Linux 5.0 powerpc
Debian Linux 5.0 mipsel
Debian Linux 5.0 mips
Debian Linux 5.0 m68k
Debian Linux 5.0 ia-64
Debian Linux 5.0 ia-32
Debian Linux 5.0 hppa
Debian Linux 5.0 armel
Debian Linux 5.0 arm
Debian Linux 5.0 amd64
Debian Linux 5.0 alpha
Debian Linux 5.0
Not Vulnerable: ISC DHCPD 4.2.1-P1
ISC DHCPD 4.1-ESV-R2
ISC DHCPD 3.1-ESV-R1
ISC DHCP Client 4.2.1-P1
ISC DHCP Client 4.1-ESV-R2
ISC DHCP Client 3.1-ESV-R1

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joomlacontenteditor (com_jce) BLIND sql injection vulnerability

===================================================================

Software: joomlacontenteditor (com_jce)

Vendor: http://www.joomlacontenteditor.net

Vuln Type: BLind SQL Injection

Download link: http://www.joomlacontenteditor.net/downloads/editor/joomla15x/category/j
oomla-15-2 (check here)

Author: eidelweiss

contact: eidelweiss[at]windowslive[dot]com

Home: http://www.eidelweiss.info

Dork: inurl:”/index.php?option=com_jce”

References: http://eidelweiss-advisories.blogspot.com/2011/04/joomlacontenteditor-co
mjce-blind-sql.html

===================================================================

Description:

JCE makes creating and editing Joomla!®

content easy Add a set of tools to your Joomla!® environment that give you the power to create the kind of content you want,

without limitations, and without needing to know or learn HTML, XHTML, CSS…

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exploit & p0c

[!] index.php?option=com_jce&Itemid=[valid Itemid]

Example p0c

[!] http://host/index.php?option=com_jce&Itemid=8 <= True

[!] http://host/index.php?option=com_jce&Itemid=-8 <= False

====================================================================

Nothing Impossible In This World Even Nobody`s Perfect

===================================================================


Password cracking is the process of recovering passwords from data that has been stored in or transmitted by a computer system. A common approach is to repeatedly try guesses for the password. The purpose of password cracking might be to help a user recover a forgotten password (though installing an entirely new password is less of a security risk, but involves system administration privileges), to gain unauthorized access to a system, or as a preventive measure by system administrators to check for easily crackable passwords. On a file-by-file basis, password cracking is utilized to gain access to digital evidence for which a judge has allowed access but the particular file’s access is restricted.
Contents
[hide]

1 Prevention
2 Software
3 References
4 External links

Prevention
Main article: Shadow password

The best method of preventing password cracking is to ensure that attackers cannot get access even to the encrypted password. For example, on the Unix operating system, encrypted passwords were originally stored in a publicly accessible file /etc/passwd. On modern Unix (and similar) systems, on the other hand, they are stored in the file /etc/shadow, which is accessible only to programs running with enhanced privileges (ie, ‘system’ privileges). This makes it harder for a malicious user to obtain the encrypted passwords in the first instance. Unfortunately, many common network protocols transmit passwords in cleartext or use weak challenge/response schemes.[1][2]

Modern Unix systems have replaced traditional DES-based password hashing with stronger methods based on MD5 and Blowfish.[3] Other systems have also begun to adopt these methods. For instance, the Cisco IOS originally used a reversible Vigenère cipher to encrypt passwords, but now uses md5-crypt with a 24-bit salt when the “enable secret” command is used.[4] These newer methods use large salt values which prevent attackers from efficiently mounting offline attacks against multiple user accounts simultaneously. The algorithms are also much slower to execute which drastically increases the time required to mount a successful offline attack.[5]

Solutions like a security token give a formal proof answer by constantly shifting password. Those solutions abruptly reduce the timeframe for brute forcing (attacker needs to break and use the password within a single shift) and they reduce the value of the stolen passwords because of its short time validity.

Software
Main category: Password cracking software

There are many password cracking software tools, but the most popular[6] are Cain and Abel, John the Ripper, Hydra, ElcomSoft and Lastbit. Many litigation support software packages also include password cracking functionality. Most of these packages employ a mixture of cracking strategies, with brute force and dictionary attacks proving to be the most productive.