Archive for the ‘A Brief History’ Category


AsiaOne
Friday, Oct 07, 2011

Steve Jobs – creative ‘genius’, Apple Co-founder and innovative businessman. These are just some terms the grieving public have tagged to Job’s name.

Tecca.com gives you a closer look into Jobs life with these 8 things that you probably did not know about Steve Jobs:

1. Early life and childhood

Steven Paul Jobs was born in San Francisco on February 24, 1955. He was given away at birth by his mother who wanted him to be adopted by college graduates.

He was supposed to be adopted by a lawyer and his wife who decided at the last minuted that the wanted a girl instead. So Jobs was given to a couple named named Clara and Paul Jobs who lived in California.

His adoptive father – a term that Jobs openly objected to – was a machinist for a laser company and his mother worked as an accountant.

Later in life, Jobs discovered the identities of his biological parents. His estranged father, Abdulfattah John Jandali, is a Syrian Muslim immigrant to the US. He left the country when he was 18 and is presently a vice president of a casino in Reno, Nevada.

His birth mother, Joanne Schieble (later Simpson) was an American graduate student of Swiss and German ancestry and later went on to become a speech language pathologist and eventually married.

While Jobs reconnected with his mother in later years, he and his father remained estranged.

2. College dropout

The brain behind the most successful company in the world never graduated from college. Jobs attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon but dropped out after a single semester.

He told a graduating class of Stanford University that he did not see the value of spending all of his working-class parents’ savings on college tution when he had no idea what he wanted to do with his life.

He continued, however to “drop in” on classes that interested him, including a calligraphy class he cited as the reason Macintosh computers were designed with multiple typefaces.

In the famouse 2005 commencement speech to Stanford University, Jobs said of his time at Reed: “It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5 cent deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the seven miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple.”

3. Lied to his Apple co-founder about a job at entertainment software company Atari

Did you know Jobs played an essential role in making the popular and influential video game ‘Breakout’ created by Atari.

When Jobs was an employee of Atari he was tasked with creating a circuit board for the game. He was offered $100 for each chip that was eliminated from the game’s final design.

Since Jobs had little knowledge of or interest in circuit board design he struck a deal with Apple co-founder and friend, Steve Wozniak. They were to split the bonus evenly between the two of the, if Wozniak could minimize the number of chips.

Wozniak reduced it by 50 chips which resulted in a $5,000 bonus. But according to Wozniak’s own autobiography, Jobs told Wozniak that Atari had given them only $700 and that Wozniak’s share was therefore $350.

 

4. His sister is a famous author

Steve Jobs first met his biological sister in 1986. Mona Simpson (born Mona Jandali) is the well known author of ‘Anywhere But Here’ – a story about a mother and daughter that was later made into a movie starring Natalie Portman and Susan Sarandon.

After reuniting, Jobs and Simpson developed a close relationship. When speaking about his sister, Job told a New York Times interviewer: “We’re family. She’s one of my best friends in the world. I call her and talk to her every couple of days.’

‘Anywhere But Here is dedicated to “my brother Steve.”

5. Celebrity romances

It is written in two unauthorized biographies of Steve Jobs, that he had a relationship with American fold singer Joan Baez. Baez confirmed the the two were close “briefly,” though her romantic connection with Bob Dylan is much better known (Dylan was the Apple icon’s favorite musician).

The biography also notes that Jobs went out with actress Diane Keaton briefly.

6. His first daughter

Jobs had his first child when he was 23 with his high school girlfriend Chris Ann Brennan. Lisa Brennan Jobs was born in 1978, just as Apple was on the rise in the tech world.

He and Brennan never married, and Jobs reportedly denied paternity claiming he was sterile in court documents. He went on to father three more children with wife Laurene Powell. After later mending his relationship with Lisa, Jobs paid for her education at Harvard.

7. Alternative lifestyle

According to Tecca.com Jobs hinted at his early experience with the hallucinogenic drug LSD. Jobs said in an interview about Microsoft founder Bill Gates that he thinks if Gates would be a “broader guy if he had dropped acid once or gone off to an ashram when he was younger”.

In a book interview, Jobs called his experience with the drug “one of the two or three most important things I have done in my life.”

Jobs travelled to India to visit the well-known Kainchi Ashram from which he went back to the US as a Zen Buddhist.

Jobs was also a pescetarian who didn’t consume most animal products, and didn’t eat meat other than fish.

8. His fortune

Jobs only earned $1 a year when he was the CEO of Apple. He kept his salary as $1 since 1997, the year he became the company’s lead executive. Of his salary, Jobs joked in 2007: “I get 50 cents a year for showing up, and the other 50 cents is based on my performance.”

In early 2011, Jobs owned 5.5 million shares of Apple. After his death, Apple shares were valued at US$377.64 (S$491.838) – a roughly 43-fold growth in valuation over the last 10 years that shows no signs of slowing down.

Steve Jobs 1955 – 2011
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Hacking For The Presidency

Credible Outlets Are Alleging Hillary Stole New Hampshire Via Commissioned Hacking

Newspaper: “Computer hackers ‘may be behind Hillary Clinton’s shock new Hampshire victory'”

January 12. 2008

Is someone this desperate to win. Has someone lost their moral compass so. What am I saying, just looking at Hillary’s track record shows she never had it.

Many outlets are asking did Hillary Clinton hack her way to a New Hampshire win. Here’s why. Hand counted votes, meaning physical votes on paper, showed Obama won in New Hampshire. However, votes counted by computer, which is hackable, mysteriously showed Hillary Clinton winning New Hampshire. A few of the articles on this scandal are cited below.

Back on August 15, 2007 in my “Hillary Clinton Slams Barack Obama” article I wrote about Hillary’s affiliation with a dirty private investigator that also specialized in hacking. 

As a matter of fact, today when I Googled the words “Hillary Clinton” and “hackers” for info on this new scandal, my site article from months ago came up in addition to the items just written about over the past two days on this subject.

Anthony Pellicano Had 4 Hackers On Staff In His West Hollywood Office That Was Raided By The FBI

It is established fact that Hillary Clinton was a client of the now incarcerated Anthony Pellicano. She hired him regarding the Paula Jones scandal and the Jennifer Flowers one as well. Both women reported invasive Anthony Pellicano style harassment being leveled at them.

While, Anthony Pellicano was arrested for illegal wiretapping, witness intimidation and identity theft, among other things,  he was known to have 4 hackers on staff.

One of his hackers destroyed the hard drive of Los Angeles Times writer Anita Busch. His hacker began hacking her computer when she started writing unflattering stories about Pellicano’s Hollywood clients.

Anita Busch

The hacker was even stupid enough to hack her computers and get advance copies of her work, forwarding it to Pellicano’s rich and famous clients.

One of his hackers even did an article with Maxim magazine bragging how she could hack and get your bank pin codes in minutes. People who hack bank info aren’t above hacking voter systems.

There’s even a documentary on it and it’s about the very type of machines (Diebold) that gave Hillary her New Hampshire victory, over Obama’s win via hand count.

Documentary “Hacking Democracy”

Pellicano paid them to hack into the computers of writers, journalists and entertainers for his perverted, nosy clients in Hollywood that paid large sums to get dirt on people or to copy and steal computer based intellectual property.

I know this stuff happens. I myself have personally experienced what commissioned hackers do, from hacking into computers, posting defamatory items on message boards and blogs, hackings web sites and the servers they sit on, disrupting many businesses  – and if paid by a person desperate enough – hacking voting systems. 

There is usually an intermediary when the person is rich and or famous. A person that communicates with the hacker(s) on behalf of the client and provides payment. That person is sometimes a private investigator or a manager.

The hacker hacks the info then passes it on to an intermediary via the internet or by mail, then it is sent to the person that commissioned it and provided payment to the intermediary. In the case of hacking to do damage to a system or changing/rigging computer data, nothing needs to be passed other than payment.  

While Pellicano is in prison, his hackers are not and there are others carrying on the invasive, illegal techniques he pioneered. There are other private investigators and hackers engaging in the same illegal activity he did on behalf of clients in Hollywood, New York and Washington.

These dirty private investigators and hackers are operating out of California, Florida, New York, Nevada and London.

This Hillary matter needs to be investigated because the last thing this country needs is people saying someone stole the election…again. This time through hacking. People don’t need to feel like their vote is not going to count.

And the last time I checked, 1 + 1 = 2, it didn’t equal 4. Voters don’t need to feel disenfranchised. It’s part of the reason I didn’t vote in the 2000 election. I got ready and was about to leave the house to go vote and saw on the news that there were significant voting problems at polls in Florida. I thought to myself, what’s the sense (I did vote in 2004 and 2006, though).

Once again, this is what I hate about politics, corruption and sometimes not really knowing where one stands until there is some scandal.


3 hours ago

Anyone else seeing an influx of blog headlines that go “Updated: [Thing That We Just Wrote About] Is A Hoax”?

While Internet hoaxes have been around since the Soviet Union wanted to join Usenet in 1984 (remember LonelyGirl15?), we’ve had quite a few doozies this week, from the woman who got a tattoo of 152 of her Facebook friends on her arm, to the eHarmony user tearing upover her love of cats, to the kidnapped lesbian Syrian blogger turning out to be a not kidnapped married guy in Scotland. Heh.

People have always been gullible, and gullible people having access to methods of dissemination like Facebook and Twitter only turns their folly up to eleven. But aren’t we as reporters paid to be filters of news, in essence paid to know better? Then why the rampant media coverage of every single one of these hoaxes?

The only answer I can come up with is that the demands of churnalism (or the recently dubbed “hamsterization” of journalism) and the quest for advertising traffic are only increasing for bloggers as more and more readers spend more and more time and money online.  This begs the question: How many of us uncritically posting on incredulous rumors and unverified viral stories are cynically calculating how even more traffic will inevitably come from our correction posts (“Update: This Was A Hoax, Again”)?

Perhaps the more innocent among us are fooled by the fact that the Internet has also increased the amount of ridiculous but true news. Media frenzies like #Weinergate and Sarah Palin’s description of Paul Revere’s ride remind us that there is plenty of bona fide news that people wish was fake, making the tech media landscape pretty much a crapshoot for bloggers focused on speed.

Even we covered that Facebook Friends tattoo story as if it were serious news. And how I wished that that story were real, letting me transform it into some bloated pseudo-intellectual weekend think piece about the ephemerality of online friendships and the quest for permanence in a digital age. Instead you guys get this.

It was only after I discovered that the  YouTube user account only had uploaded one video prior to “My Social Tattoo” and any kind of identifying details about the poster were nowhere to be found did I drop it as a viable source for reblogging, moving on (quickly as always) to the next source of news. But man, like everybody else, I wanted to believe that some idiot got this breathtakingly dumb tattoo. I mean it could happen, right?

In 2011 a retweet can function as the online equivalent of gawking at a car crash, even when the story seems too good (or more likely, bad) to be true. Perhaps this is why the hashtag#SeriouslyMcDonalds was a trending topic this morning, after a sign mandating African American McDonald’s patrons pay a $1.50 surcharge went viral.  Even McDonald’s Twitter account quickly declared this a “hoax”, but the #SeriouslyMcDonalds hashtag continues to appear in around 20 tweets a second.

Perhaps the most interesting hoax story to come out of an slow summer week  otherwise filled with Apple news, was the tale of a David Voelkert, who was arrested after his ex-wife lured him into revealing his plans to murder her, by posing as a teen admirer on Facebook.

While the initial wave of stories were along the lines of “Man Arrested After Wife’s Facebook Teen Ruse SHOCKER ,” the updates to the story provided a very interested interesting twist, as it turns out that Voelkert suspected that his wife was behind the fake profile and went to a notary in order to prove himself innocent before sending the otherwise incriminating messages.

Voelkert did what we bloggers should be doing more of, taking what happens online with a grain of salt. Granted, he probably had way more time.


A Brief History

One might not suspect that the art, or scourge, of computer hacking was created at one of the havens for technological excellence.

True, at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), a group of students developed the technique and borrowed their name from the “hackers” of the late 1800s who found amusement in pranking the emerging telephone companies.Getting their laughs and skills from hacking and cracking into primitive computers and exploiting the Arpanet (predecessor to the internet), they created a novelty that would become the target of federal crackdown in years to come. To define hacking in short, we can say that an artistic criminal offense of breaking into another remote system without the owner’s consent for the purpose of stealing information is what is hacking.

However, the act of hacking started out innocently, and was basically a method of trying to figure out how computer systems worked. The 1970s saw the rise in “phreaking,” or phone hacking, headed by John Draper. This method allowed the user of a “blue box,”, when used with a Captain Crunch whistle of 2600 hertz which accessed the AT&T long distance system, to make free long distance calls. Hackers initiated with accessing the free phone calls through a varied range of sources, thereby managing to circumvent into the nation’s radio system and the phoning system resulting in a tremendous phone fraud nationwide.

After the age of “phreaking,” computers became not only the target, but also the forum, for a growing hacker population to communicate. The creation of bulletin board systems (BBS) allowed this communication and the technological possibility of more serious government and credit card hacking became possible. At this time in the early 80’s, hacking groups such as the Legion of Doom began to emerge in the United States, giving organization, and thus more power to hackers across the country.

Once this happened, breaking into the computers became a legitimate activity, with its own groups and soon its own voice with the 2600 magazine, launched in 1984. The effects of computer hacking were serious. Two years later, inevitably, Congress launched the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act that outlawed hacking. Over the years, there was a series of noticeable occurrences as the worst consequential effect of computer hacking on more high profile cases, such as the Morris Worm, responsible for infecting government and university systems, and the Mitnick case in 1995, which captured Kevin Mitnick, steeling as many as 20000 credit card numbers.

In 1999, security software became widely known by the public, and with the release of new Windows programs, which were littered with security weaknesses, they became successful because of necessity. This fraudulent act of computer hacking is perhaps the major problem, confronting the rapidly expanding population of Internet users today, with the systems still trying to battle online hackers.